time to bleed by Joe Damato

technical ramblings from a wanna-be unix dinosaur

Archive for the ‘debug’ tag

What is a ruby object? (introducing Memprof.dump)

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After Joe released memprof a few days ago, I started thinking about ways to add more functionality.

The initial Memprof release only offered a simple stats api, inspired by the one in bleak_house:

require 'memprof'
Memprof.start
o = Object.new
Memprof.stats
      1 test.rb:3:Object

With the help of lloyd‘s excellent yajl json library, I’ve slowly been building a full-featured heap dumper: Memprof.dump.

require 'memprof'
Memprof.start
[]
Memprof.dump
[
  {
    "address": "0xea52f0",
    "source": "test.rb:3",
    "type": "array",
    "length": 0
  }
]

Where can I find it?

This new heap dumper will be in the next release of Memprof. If you want to play with it, checkout the heap_dump branch on github.

What else is planned?

Over the next few days, I’m going to add a Memprof.dump_all method to dump out the entire ruby heap. This full dump will contain complete knowledge of the ruby object graph (what objects point to other objects), and its json format will allow for easy analysis. I’m envisioning a set of post-processing tools that can find leaks, calculate object memory usage, and generate various visualizations of memory consumption and object hierarchies.

Why should I care?

In building and testing Memprof.dump, I’ve learned a lot about different types of ruby objects. The rest of this post covers interesting details about common ruby objects, with examples of how they’re created and what they look like inside the MRI VM.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Aman Gupta

December 14th, 2009 at 5:59 am

memprof: A Ruby level memory profiler

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What is memprof and why do I care?

memprof is a Ruby gem which supplies memory profiler functionality similar to bleak_house without patching the Ruby VM. You just install the gem, call a function or two, and off you go.

Where do I get it?

memprof is available on gemcutter, so you can just:

gem install memprof

Feel free to browse the source code at: http://github.com/ice799/memprof.

How do I use it?

Using memprof is simple. Before we look at some examples, let me explain more precisely what memprof is measuring.

memprof is measuring the number of objects created and not destroyed during a segment of Ruby code. The ideal use case for memprof is to show you where objects that do not get destroyed are being created:

  • Objects are created and not destroyed when you create new classes. This is a good thing.
  • Sometimes garbage objects sit around until garbage_collect has had a chance to run. These objects will go away.
  • Yet in other cases you might be holding a reference to a large chain of objects without knowing it. Until you remove this reference, the entire chain of objects will remain in memory taking up space.

memprof will show objects created in all cases listed above.

OK, now Let’s take a look at two examples and their output.

A simple program with an obvious memory “leak”:

require 'memprof'

@blah = Hash.new([])

Memprof.start
100.times {
  @blah[1] << "aaaaa"
}

1000.times {
   @blah[2] << "bbbbb"
}
Memprof.stats
Memprof.stop

This program creates 1100 objects which are not destroyed during the start and stop sections of the file because references are held for each object created.

Let's look at the output from memprof:

   1000 test.rb:11:String
    100 test.rb:7:String

In this example memprof shows the 1100 created, broken up by file, line number, and type.

Let's take a look at another example:

require 'memprof'
Memprof.start
require "stringio"
StringIO.new
Memprof.stats

This simple program is measuring the number of objects created when requiring stringio.

Let's take a look at the output:

    108 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:__node__
     14 test2.rb:3:String
      2 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:Class
      1 test2.rb:4:StringIO
      1 test2.rb:4:String
      1 test2.rb:3:Array
      1 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:Enumerable

This output shows an internal Ruby interpreter type __node__ was created (these represent code), as well as a few Strings and other objects. Some of these objects are just garbage objects which haven't had a chance to be recycled yet.

What if nudge the garbage_collector along a little bit just for our example? Let's add the following two lines of code to our previous example:

GC.start
Memprof.stats

We're now nudging the garbage collector and outputting memprof stats information again. This should show fewer objects, as the garbage collector will recycle some of the garbage objects:

    108 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:__node__
      2 test2.rb:3:String
      2 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:Class
      1 /custom/ree/lib/ruby/1.8/x86_64-linux/stringio.so:0:Enumerable

As you can see above, a few Strings and other objects went away after the garbage collector ran.

Which Rubies and systems are supported?

  • Only unstripped binaries are supported. To determine if your Ruby binary is stripped, simply run: file `which ruby`. If it is, consult your package manager's documentation. Most Linux distributions offer a package with an unstripped Ruby binary.
  • Only x86_64 is supported at this time. Hopefully, I'll have time to add support for i386/i686 in the immediate future.
  • Linux Ruby Enterprise Edition (1.8.6 and 1.8.7) is supported.
  • Linux MRI Ruby 1.8.6 and 1.8.7 built with --disable-shared are supported. Support for --enable-shared binaries is coming soon.
  • Snow Leopard support is experimental at this time.
  • Ruby 1.9 support coming soon.

How does it work?

If you've been reading my blog over the last week or so, you'd have noticed two previous blog posts (here and here) that describe some tricks I came up with for modifying a running binary image in memory.

memprof is a combination of all those tricks and other hacks to allow memory profiling in Ruby without the need for custom patches to the Ruby VM. You simply require the gem and off you go.

memprof works by inserting trampolines on object allocation and deallocation routines. It gathers metadata about the objects and outputs this information when the stats method is called.

What else is planned?

Myself, Jake Douglas, and Aman Gupta have lots of interesting ideas for new features. We don't want to ruin the surprise, but stay tuned. More cool stuff coming really soon :)

Thanks for reading and don't forget to subscribe (via RSS or e-mail) and follow me on twitter.

Written by Joe Damato

December 11th, 2009 at 5:59 am

Hot patching inlined functions with x86_64 asm metaprogramming

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Disclaimer

The tricks, techniques, and ugly hacks in this article are PLATFORM SPECIFIC, DANGEROUS, and NOT PORTABLE.

This article will make reference to information in my previous article Rewrite your Ruby VM at runtime to hot patch useful features so be sure to check it out if you find yourself lost during this article.

Also, this might not qualify as metaprogramming in the traditional definition1, but this article will show how to generate assembly at runtime that works well with the particular instructions generated for a binary. In other words, the assembly is constructed based on data collected from the binary at runtime. When I explained this to Aman, he called it assembly metaprogramming.

TLDR

This article expands on a previous article by showing how to hook functions which are inlined by the compiler. This technique can be applied to other binaries, but the binary in question is Ruby Enterprise Edition 1.8.7. The use case is to build a memory profiler without requiring patches to the VM, but just a Ruby gem.

It’s on GitHub

The memory profiler is NOT DONE, yet. It will be soon. Stay tuned.

The code described here is incorporated into a Ruby Gem which can be found on github: http://github.com/ice799/memprof specifically at: http://github.com/ice799/memprof/blob/master/ext/memprof.c#L202-318

Overview of the plan of attack

The plan of attack is relatively straight forward:

  1. Find the inlined code.
  2. Overwrite part of it to redirect to a stub.
  3. Call out to a handler from the stub.
  4. Make sure the return path is sane.

As simple as this seems, implementing these steps is actually a bit tricky.

Finding pieces of inlined code

Before finding pieces of inlined code, let’s first examine the C code we want to hook. I’m going to be showing how to hook the inline function add_freelist.

The code for add_freelist is short:

static inline void
add_freelist(p)
    RVALUE *p;
{
    if (p->as.free.flags != 0)
        p->as.free.flags = 0;
    if (p->as.free.next != freelist)
        p->as.free.next = freelist;
    freelist = p;
}

There is one really important feature of this code which stands out almost immediately. freelist has (at least) compilation unit scope. This is awesome because freelist serves as a marker when searching for assembly instructions to overwrite. Since the freelist has compilation unit scope, it’ll live at some static memory location.

If we find writes to this static memory location, we find our inline function code.

Let’s take a look at the instructions generated from this C code (unrelated instructions snipped out):

  437f21:       48 c7 00 00 00 00 00    movq   $0x0,(%rax)
   . . . . .
  437f2c:       48 8b 05 65 de 2d 00    mov    0x2dde65(%rip),%rax  # 715d98 [freelist]
   . . . . .
  437f48:       48 89 05 49 de 2d 00    mov    %rax,0x2dde49(%rip)  # 715d98 [freelist]

The last instruction above updates freelist, it is the instruction generated for the C statement freelist = p;.

As you can see from the instruction, the destination is freelist. This makes it insanely easy to locate instances of this inline function. Just need to write a piece of C code which scans the binary image in memory, searching for mov instructions where the destination is freelist and I’ve found the inlined instances of add_freelist.

Why not insert a trampoline by overwriting that last mov instruction?

Overwriting with a jmp

The mov instruction above is 7 bytes wide. As long as the instruction we’re going to implant is 7 bytes or thinner, everything is good to go. Using a callq is out of the question because we can’t ensure the stack is 16-byte aligned as per the x86_64 ABI2. As it turns out, a jmp instruction that uses a 32bit displacement from the instruction pointer only requires 5 bytes. We’ll be able to implant the instruction that’s needed, and even have room to spare.

I created a struct to encapsulate this short 7 byte trampoline. 5 bytes for the jmp, 2 bytes for NOPs. Let’s take a look:

  struct tramp_inline tramp = {
    .jmp           = {'\xe9'},
    .displacement  = 0,
    .pad           = {'\x90', '\x90'},
  };

Let’s fill in the displacement later, after actually finding the instruction that’s going to get overwritten.

So, to find the instruction that’ll be overwritten, just look for a mov opcode and check that the destination is freelist:

    /* make sure it is a mov instruction */
    if (byte[1] == '\x89') {

      /* Read the REX byte to make sure it is a mov that we care about */
      if ( (byte[0] == '\x48') ||
          (byte[0] == '\x4c') ) {

        /* Grab the target of the mov. REMEMBER: in this case the target is 
         * a 32bit displacment that gets added to RIP (where RIP is the adress of
         * the next instruction).
         */
        mov_target = *(uint32_t *)(byte + 3);

        /* Sanity check. Ensure that the displacement from freelist to the next
         * instruction matches the mov_target. If so, we know this mov is
         * updating freelist.
         */
        if ( (freelist - (void *)(byte+7) ) == mov_target) {

At this point we’ve definitely found a mov instruction with freelist as the destination. Let’s calculate the displacement to the stage 2 trampoline for our jmp instruction and write the instruction into memory.

/* Setup the stage 1 trampoline. Calculate the displacement to
 * the stage 2 trampoline from the next instruction.
 *
 * REMEMBER!!!! The next instruction will be NOP after our stage 1
 * trampoline is written. This is 5 bytes into the structure, even
 * though the original instruction we overwrote was 7 bytes.
 */
 tramp.displacement = (uint32_t)(destination - (void *)(byte+5));

/* Figure out what page the stage 1 tramp is gonna be written to, mark
 * it WRITE, write the trampoline in, and then remove WRITE permission.
 */
 aligned_addr = page_align(byte);
 mprotect(aligned_addr, (void *)byte - aligned_addr + 10,
               PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC);
 memcpy(byte, &tramp, sizeof(struct tramp_inline));
 mprotect(aligned_addr, (void *)byte - aligned_addr + 10,
              PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC);

Cool, all that’s left is to build the stage 2 trampoline which will set everything up for the C level handler.

An assembly stub to set the stage for our C handler

So, what does the assembly need to do to call the C handler? Quite a bit actually so let’s map it out, step by step:

  1. Replicate the instruction which was overwritten so that the object is actually added to the freelist.
  2. Save the value of rdi register. This register is where the first argument to a function lives and will store the obj that was added to the freelist for the C handler to do analysis on.
  3. Load the object being added to the freelist into rdi
  4. Save the value of rbx so that we can use the register as an operand for an absolute indirect callq instruction.
  5. Save rbp and rsp to allow a way to undo the stack alignment later.
  6. Align the stack to a 16-byte boundary to comply with the x86_64 ABI.
  7. Move the address of the handler into rbx
  8. Call the handler through rbx.
  9. Restore rbp, rsp, rdi, rbx.
  10. Jump back to the instruction after the instruction which was overwritten.

To accomplish this let’s build out a structure with as much set up as possible and fill in the displacement fields later. This “base” struct looks like this:

  struct inline_tramp_tbl_entry inline_ent = {
    .rex     = {'\x48'},
    .mov     = {'\x89'},
    .src_reg = {'\x05'},
    .mov_displacement = 0,

    .frame = {
      .push_rdi = {'\x57'},
      .mov_rdi = {'\x48', '\x8b', '\x3d'},
      .rdi_source_displacement = 0,
      .push_rbx = {'\x53'},
      .push_rbp = {'\x55'},
      .save_rsp = {'\x48', '\x89', '\xe5'},
      .align_rsp = {'\x48', '\x83', '\xe4', '\xf0'},
      .mov = {'\x48', '\xbb'},
      .addr = error_tramp,
      .callq = {'\xff', '\xd3'},
      .leave = {'\xc9'},
      .rbx_restore = {'\x5b'},
      .rdi_restore = {'\x5f'},
    },

    .jmp  = {'\xe9'},
    .jmp_displacement = 0,
  };

So, what’s left to do:

  1. Copy the REX and source register bytes of the instruction which was overwritten to replicate it.
  2. Calculate the displacement to freelist to fully generate the overwritten mov.
  3. Calculate the displacement to freelist so that it can be stored in rdi as an argument to the C handler.
  4. Fill in the absolute address for the handler.
  5. Calculate the displacement to the instruction after the stage 1 trampoline in order to jmp back to resume execution as normal.

Doing that is relatively straight-forward. Let’s take a look at the C snippets that make this happen:

/* Before the stage 1 trampoline gets written, we need to generate
 * the code for the stage 2 trampoline. Let's copy over the REX byte
 * and the byte which mentions the source register into the stage 2
 * trampoline.
 */
inl_tramp_st2 = inline_tramp_table + entry;
inl_tramp_st2->rex[0] = byte[0];
inl_tramp_st2->src_reg[0] = byte[2];

. . . . . 

/* Finish setting up the stage 2 trampoline. */

/* calculate the displacement to freelist from the next instruction.
 *
 * This is used to replicate the original instruction we overwrote.
 */
inl_tramp_st2->mov_displacement = freelist - (void *)&(inl_tramp_st2->frame);

/* fill in the displacement to freelist from the next instruction.
 *
 * This is to arrange for the new value in freelist to be in %rdi, and as such
 * be the first argument to the C handler. As per the amd64 ABI.
 */
inl_tramp_st2->frame.rdi_source_displacement = freelist - 
                                          (void *)&(inl_tramp_st2->frame.push_rbx);

/* jmp back to the instruction after stage 1 trampoline was inserted 
 *
 * This can be 5 or 7, it doesn't matter. If its 5, we'll hit our 2
 * NOPS. If its 7, we'll land directly on the next instruction.
 */
inl_tramp_st2->jmp_displacement = (uint32_t)((void *)(byte + 7) -
                                         (void *)(inline_tramp_table + entry + 1));

/* write the address of our C level trampoline in to the structure */
inl_tramp_st2->frame.addr = freelist_tramp;

Awesome.

We’ve successfully patched the binary in memory, inserted an assembly stub which was generated at runtime, called a hook function, and ensured that execution can resume normally.

So, what’s the status on that memory profiler?

Almost done, stay tuned for more updates coming SOON.

Conclusion

  • Hackery like this is unmaintainable, unstable, stupid, but also fun to work on and think about.
  • Being able to hook add_freelist like this provides the last tool needed to implement a version of bleak_house (a Ruby memory profiler) without patching the Ruby VM.
  • x86_64 instruction set is a painful instruction set.
  • Use the GNU assembler (gas) instead of trying to generate opcodes by reading the Intel instruction set PDFs if you value your sanity.

Thanks for reading and don’t forget to subscribe (via RSS or e-mail) and follow me on twitter.

References

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaprogramming []
  2. x86_64 ABI []

Written by Joe Damato

December 10th, 2009 at 5:59 am

Debugging Ruby: Understanding and Troubleshooting the VM and your Application

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Download the PDF here.

Debugging Ruby

Written by Aman Gupta

December 2nd, 2009 at 8:30 pm

Rewrite your Ruby VM at runtime to hot patch useful features

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Some notes before the blood starts flowin’

  • CAUTION: What you are about to read is dangerous, non-portable, and (in most cases) stupid.
  • The code and article below refer only to the x86_64 architecture.
  • Grab some gauze. This is going to get ugly.

TLDR

This article shows off a Ruby gem which has the power to overwrite a Ruby binary in memory while it is running to allow your code to execute in place of internal VM functions. This is useful if you’d like to hook all object allocation functions to build a memory profiler.

This gem is on GitHub

Yes, it’s on GitHub: http://github.com/ice799/memprof.

I want a memory profiler for Ruby

This whole science experiment started during RubyConf when Aman and I began brainstorming ways to build a memory profiling tool for Ruby.

The big problem in our minds was that for most tools we’d have to include patches to the Ruby VM. That process is long and somewhat difficult, so I started thinking about ways to do this without modifying the Ruby source code itself.

The memory profiler is NOT DONE just yet. I thought that the hack I wrote to let us build something without modifying Ruby source code was interesting enough that it warranted a blog post. So let’s get rolling.

What is a trampoline?

Let’s pretend you have 2 functions: functionA() and functionB(). Let’s assume that functionA() calls functionB().

Now also imagine that you’d like to insert a piece of code to execute in between the call to functionB(). You can imagine inserting a piece of code that diverts execution elsewhere, creating a flow: functionA() –> functionC() –> functionB()

You can accomplish this by inserting a trampoline.

A trampoline is a piece of code that program execution jumps into and then bounces out of and on to somewhere else1.

This hack relies on the use of multiple trampolines. We’ll see why shortly.

Two different kinds of trampolines

There are two different kinds of trampolines that I considered while writing this hack, let’s take a closer look at both.

Caller-side trampoline

A caller-side trampoline works by overwriting the opcodes in the .text segment of the program in the calling function causing it to call a different function at runtime.

The big pros of this method are:

  • You aren’t overwriting any code, only the address operand of a callq instruction.
  • Since you are only changing an operand, you can hook any function. You don’t need to build custom trampolines for each function.

This method also has some big cons too:

  • You’ll need to scan the entire binary in memory and find and overwrite all address operands of callq. This is problematic because if you overwrite any false-positives you might break your application.
  • You have to deal with the implications of callq, which can be painful as we’ll see soon.

Callee-side trampoline

A callee-side trampoline works by overwriting the opcodes in the .text segment of the program in the called function, causing it to call another function immediately

The big pro of this method is:

  • You only need to overwrite code in one place and don’t need to worry about accidentally scribbling on bytes that you didn’t mean to.

this method has some big cons too:

  • You’ll need to carefully construct your trampoline code to only overwrite as little of the function as possible (or some how restore opcodes), especially if you expect the original function to work as expected later.
  • You’ll need to special case each trampoline you build for different optimization levels of the binary you are hooking into.

I went with a caller-side trampoline because I wanted to ensure that I can hook any function and not have to worry about different Ruby binaries causing problems when they are compiled with different optimization levels.

The stage 1 trampoline

To insert my trampolines I needed to insert some binary into the process and then overwrite callq instructions like this:

  41150b:       e8 cc 4e 02 00         callq  4363dc [rb_newobj]
  411510:       48 89 45 f8             ....

In the above code snippet, the byte e8 is the callq opcode and the bytes cc 4e 02 00 are the distance to rb_newobj from the address of the next instruction, 0×411510

All I need to do is change the 4 bytes following e8 to equal the displacement between the next instruction, 0×411510 in this case, and my trampoline.

Problem.

My first cut at this code lead me to an important realization: the callq instructions used expect a 32bit displacement from the function I am calling and not absolute addresses. But, the 64bit address space is very large. The displacement between the code for the Ruby binary that lives in the .text segment is so far away from my Ruby gem that the displacement cannot be represented with only 32bits.

So what now?

Well, luckily mmap has a flag MAP_32BIT which maps a page in the first 2GB of the address space. If I map some code there, it should be well within the range of values whose displacement I can represent in 32bits.

So, why not map a second trampoline to that page which can contains code that can call an absolute address?

My stage 1 trampoline code looks something like this:

  /* the struct below is just a sequence of bytes which represent the
    *  following bit of assembly code, including 3 nops for padding:
    *  
    *  mov $address, %rbx
    *  callq *%rbx
    *  ret
    *  nop
    *  nop
    *  nop
    */
  struct tramp_tbl_entry ent = {
    .mov = {'\x48','\xbb'},
    .addr = (long long)&error_tramp,
    .callq = {'\xff','\xd3'},
    .ret = '\xc3',
    .pad =  {'\x90','\x90','\x90'},
  };

  tramp_table = mmap(NULL, 4096, PROT_WRITE|PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC, 
                                   MAP_32BIT|MAP_ANONYMOUS|MAP_PRIVATE, -1, 0);
  if (tramp_table != MAP_FAILED) {
    for (; i < 4096/sizeof(struct tramp_tbl_entry); i ++ ) {
      memcpy(tramp_table + i, &ent, sizeof(struct tramp_tbl_entry));
    }
  }
}

It mmaps a single page and writes a table of default trampolines (like a jump table) that all call an error trampoline by default. When a new trampoline is inserted, I just go to that entry in the table and insert the address that should be called.

To get around the displacement challenge described above, the addresses I insert into the stage 1 trampoline table are addresses for stage 2 trampolines.

The stage 2 trampoline

Setting up the stage 2 trampolines are pretty simple once the stage 1 trampoline table has been written to memory. All that needs to be done is update the address field in a free stage 1 trampoline to be the address of my stage 2 trampoline. These trampolines are written in C and live in my Ruby gem.

static void
insert_tramp(char *trampee, void *tramp) {
  void *trampee_addr = find_symbol(trampee);
  int entry = tramp_size;
  tramp_table[tramp_size].addr = (long long)tramp;
  tramp_size++;
  update_image(entry, trampee_addr);
}

An example of a stage 2 trampoline for rb_newobj might be:

static VALUE
newobj_tramp() {
  /* print the ruby source and line number where the allocation is occuring */
  printf("source = %s, line = %d\n", ruby_sourcefile, ruby_sourceline);

  /* call newobj like normal so the ruby app can continue */
  return rb_newobj();
}

Programatically rewriting the Ruby binary in memory

Overwriting the Ruby binary to cause my stage 1 trampolines to get hit is pretty simple, too. I can just scan the .text segment of the binary looking for bytes which look like callq instructions. Then, I can sanity check by reading the next 4 bytes which should be the displacement to the original function. Doing that sanity check should prevent false positives.

static void
update_image(int entry, void *trampee_addr) {
  char *byte = text_segment;
  size_t count = 0;
  int fn_addr = 0;
  void *aligned_addr = NULL;

 /* check each byte in the .text segment */
  for(; count < text_segment_len; count++) {

    /* if it looks like a callq instruction... */
    if (*byte == '\xe8') {

      /* the next 4 bytes SHOULD BE the original displacement */
      fn_addr = *(int *)(byte+1);

      /* do a sanity check to make sure the next few bytes are an accurate displacement.
        * this helps to eliminate false positives.
        */
      if (trampee_addr - (void *)(byte+5) == fn_addr) {
        aligned_addr = (void*)(((long)byte+1)&~(0xffff));

        /* mark the page in the .text segment as writable so it can be modified */
        mprotect(aligned_addr, (void *)byte+1 - aligned_addr + 10, 
                       PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC);

        /* calculate the new displacement and write it */
        *(int  *)(byte+1) = (uint32_t)((void *)(tramp_table + entry) 
                                     - (void *)(byte + 5));
 
        /* disallow writing to this page of the .text segment again  */
        mprotect(aligned_addr, (((void *)byte+1) - aligned_addr) + 10,
                      PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC);
      }
    }
    byte++;
  }
}

Sample output

After requiring my ruby gem and running a test script which creates lots of objects, I see this output:

...
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
source = test.rb, line = 8
...

Showing the file name and line number for each object getting allocated. That should be a strong enough primitive to build a Ruby memory profiler without requiring end users to build a custom version of Ruby. It should also be possible to re-implement bleak_house by using this gem (and maybe another trick or two).

Awesome.

Conclusion

  • One step closer to building a memory profiler without requiring end users to find and use patches floating around the internet.
  • It is unclear whether cheap tricks like this are useful or harmful, but they are fun to write.
  • If you understand how your system works at an intimate level, nearly anything is possible. The work required to make it happen might be difficult though.

Thanks for reading and don't forget to subscribe (via RSS or e-mail) and follow me on twitter.

References

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trampoline_(computers) []

Written by Joe Damato

November 23rd, 2009 at 5:59 am